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DVM Course Tables: Spring

First-Year Course Table: Spring

VM Title of Course Credits
8824 Moving 9
8110 Sensing and Seeing 10
8666 Becoming a Veterinary Professional II 2

Course descriptions

The Becoming a Professional stream consists of 3 semesters of coursework that aims to assist students in their personal and professional development throughout the year 1-2 curriculum. The program comprises a wide range of professional competencies that are not addressed specifically in the scientific curriculum. These include the following, not in order of importance: animal welfare, clinical communication skills, career opportunities within veterinary medicine, history of the profession, legislation, personal finance, personal skills, practice management, professional behavior, a reflective approach to personal and professional development, thinking skills, and a variety of other veterinary issues. Each of these topics will be revisited over the next two years with more-complex material introduced each semester. The program will also introduce the student to the college's Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH).

This course provides core knowledge, skills and attributes of a veterinary professional as they pertain to the musculoskeletal system. This course will cover common diseases of domestic animals that limit the functions of the musculoskeletal system. Other topics that are discussed are the diagnosis, treatment and control of these diseases, the side effects of pain, as well as pain management.

We will integrate the fundamental principles of anatomy, physiology and microanatomy of the nervous, ocular, and dermatological systems with common clinical diseases that limit the function of these systems in domestic species. Students will also be studying the treatment and control of diseases affecting these systems, as well as, being introduced to the fundamental principles of anesthesia.


Second-Year Course Table: Spring

VM Title of Course Credits
8194 The Next Generation 9
8204 Healthy Populations 7
8667 Becoming a Veterinary Professional III 2

Course descriptions

This course will cover the anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and medical aspects associated with conception, embryonic and fetal development, gestation, delivery, and lactation. Other topics that will be covered are neonatal development, disorders and management. Students will be given hands-on experience with surgical and medical management of fertility with experience performing canine ovariohysterectomy.

This course will focus on the principles of epidemiology, biosecurity, population dynamics, and preventive health management of populations. Since human and animal health interface within the environment, One Health concepts will be utilized to prepare students to the role of veterinarians in the diagnosis and prevention of zoonotic conditions, food security, food safety, food defense, meat hygiene, antimicrobial usage and prevention of antimicrobial resistance. Surgical and medical management of fertility including canine ovariohysterectomy will continue from the previous course, the Next Generation.

The Becoming A Professional stream consists of 3 semesters of coursework which aims to assist students in their personal and professional development throughout the year 1-2 curriculum. The program comprises a wide range of professional competencies which are not addressed specifically in the scientific curriculum. These include, not in order of importance: animal welfare, clinical communication skills, career opportunities within veterinary medicine, history of the profession, legislation, personal finance, personal skills, practice management, professional behavior, a reflective approach to personal and professional development, thinking skills and a variety of other veterinary issues. Each of these topics will be revisited over the next two years with more complex material introduced each semester. The program will also introduce the student to the veterinary teaching hospital (VTH).


Third-Year Course Table: Spring

VM Title of Course Credits
8214 Small Animal Medicine 2
8604 Small Animal Emergency Medicine 2
8714 Small Animal Oncology 2
8264 Small Animal Nutrition 1
8610 Food Animal Population Medicine 2
9044 Food Animal Problem Solving 2
8734 Beef Production 1
8744 Dairy Production 1
8774 Food Animal Clinical Reproduction 1
8670 Special Topics in Equine Clinical Practice 2
8030 Special Topics in Equine Clinical Practice Lab 1
8130 Special Topics in Equine Problem-Solving 2
8394 Equine Nutrition 1
8814 The Next Equid 3
8020 Equine Diagnostic Techniques for the Digestive, Nervous, and Integumentary Systems 1
8224 Problem-Solving in Public and Corporate Veterinary Practice 2
9064 Advanced Histopathology 1
8844 Applied Veterinary Diagnostics 2
8494 Aquatic Medicine and Fish Health 2
9004 Avian Medicine and Surgery 1
8810 Care Forward 2
8864 Clinical Reptile Medicine 1
8784 Decision-Making in Veterinary Pharmacology 2
8024 Descriptive Embryology 1
7014 Environmental Health 3
7314 Infectious Disease Epidemiology 3
9224 Pocket Pets Medicine 1
8000 Small Animal Behavioral Medicine 1
8464 Topics in Veterinary Public Health 2
8704 Veterinary Cytopathology 1
8594 Wildlife Medicine 1

Course descriptions

TRACK REQUIRED COURSES

This course presents current and in-depth information about diseases that affect horses of all ages, excluding the neonatal foal. Areas covered include anesthesiology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, nephrology, cutaneous neoplasia and wound healing, castration, and preventive medicine.

This course is aligned with the fall Equine Clinical Practice: Breathing, Circulating and Moving, and focuses on development of clinical techniques associated with ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, dentistry, dermatology, wound healing, castration, and preventive medicine.

This course will cover many of the common diseases and issues seen by practicing equine veterinarians. Some topics of discussion will include, but not limited to, incoordination, colic, neurologic diseases, skin mass, dentistry, alopecia, fever, and diagnostic imaging.

This course will expand upon the equine knowledge obtained in The Next Generation. It will focus on learning the aspects of equine theriogenology and foal care that are applicable to primary care equine practice.

This laboratory-centered course will provide advanced training and experience in performing and interpreting techniques commonly used in equine practice. Specifically, the techniques learned and practiced in the course complement the material taught in the Equine Medicine and Surgery 2 and Equine Problem Solving 2 courses.

The Equine Nutrition course is designed to develop day one veterinary competency in equine nutrition. How should the healthy horse be fed? How should the horse with a nutrition-sensitive health condition be fed? After completing this course, students will be able to evaluate and design rations for horses of varying physiologic and pathophysiologic statuses.

This course presents the concepts of production diseases at the herd level which includes the diagnostic, therapeutic, and prevention techniques that are applied at the herd level rather than the individual animal.

This course presents the practice of clinical reproductive techniques in a food animal or mixed animal practice. The course will include demonstration and performance of techniques for evaluation of clinical reproduction for individual animals in herds of food animal species including cattle, sheep, goats, and swine. Emphasis is on clinical techniques such as ultrasonography of the reproductive tract of males and females, breeding soundness evaluations of bulls, pregnancy evaluation of the bovine reproductive tract, as well as dystocia and fetotomy techniques in the bovine.

This course will examine in detail dairy production, medicine, and management. Surgical experience in Displaced Abomasum repair will also be done.

This course will examine in detail beef production, medicine, and management. Surgical experience in caesarian section will also occur.

In this course, students will be learn to identify common medical problems of food animals, including disorders/diseases of reproduction, the mammary gland, metabolism, nutrition, the musculoskeletal system, the gastrointestinal system, the respiratory system, the hemolymphatic system, and the neurologic system, formulate a differential diagnosis list for common clinical food animal conditions, recommend appropriate diagnostic tests and interpret test results, recommend a therapeutic regimen and monitoring system to evaluate success of treatment, establish an economically-based control/prevention protocol, determine herd implications of common medical problems, and read and evaluate published, peer-reviewed articles to determine implications on diagnosis and treatment options.

This course is a comprehensive study on the approach, pathophysiology, diagnosis, staging, and management of cancer in small animals.

This course provides current information on major aspects of small animal emergency medicine and critical care. Topics include management of shock, oxygenation, blood pressure management, and CPR as well as emergent treatment of systemic disease, traumatic injuries and toxicological emergencies. Techniques including bandaging, central line placement, centesis, and tracheostomy are discussed and performed in a laboratory setting.

This course will instruct students, in regards to specific disorders of the endocrine, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, hematologic, urinary, and respiratory systems of dogs and cats, to be able to describe the pathophysiological mechanisms, identify and associate abnormal clinical signs and physical examination findings, identify and formulate a list of medical problems, formulate a list of prioritized differential diagnoses for those problems, develop an appropriate diagnostic plan, analyze and interpret diagnostic test results, and design an appropriate therapeutic and monitoring plan.

The Small Animal Nutrition course is designed to develop day one veterinary competency in small animal nutrition. How should the healthy cat/dog be fed? How should the cat/dog with a nutrition-sensitive health condition be fed? After completing this course, students will be able to evaluate and design diets for cats/dogs of varying physiologic and pathophysiologic statuses.

This course will present public and corporate veterinary practice case studies in a problem-oriented format. Due to the breadth of public veterinary practice, a diversity of cases will be presented representing real situations that veterinarians in public practice have had to resolve or manage. Cases will vary from year to year depending on class interest and speaker availability. The course will be oriented towards developing critical thinking skills, recognizing the perspectives that must be considered, and understanding the broad, sometimes national and international impacts of decision making. Communication skills will also be emphasized.

ELECTIVE COURSES

In this course students will learn about the process for preparation of histologic slides from tissues derived at necropsy and biopsy and identify processing artifacts in tissues, to identify and describe cellular and tissue changes in response to injury, to identify and describe infectious organisms in tissue sections using conventional and special stains, to identify and describe epithelial, mesenchymal, and round cell neoplasms, to identify and describe microscopic lesions in multiple tissues a wide variety of species, and how to write and interpret histologic descriptions. Students will also learn about diseases due to viruses, bacteria, fungi, helminths & protozoa. Immunopathology will also be taught.

This course will focus on interpretation of laboratory data and imaging in common domestic species, with an emphasis on relating abnormal diagnostic results to gross lesions and disease pathogenesis. The majority of this course will be administered using a mixture of traditional lectures and case-based learning sessions.

This course will teach etiology, diagnosis, pathology, pathogenesis, chemotherapy, control and management of infectious and non-infectious diseases of aquatic organisms, especially pertaining to cultured food, ornamental and tropical fish. Hands on lab experience with water quality evaluation, non-lethal and lethal diagnostic techniques, and the identification of common pathogenic organisms.

This course will introduce students to the common diseases that affect pet birds. Students will be expected to apply problem solving / critical thinking skills to construct (reverse engineer) clinical presentations from pathological findings. Development of differential diagnosis lists and diagnostic plans will be emphasized. Approaches to treatment, control and prevention of will be discussed.

In this course students will learn to produce personal and professional goals to create life balance, identify potential stressors in both work and personal life, construct wellness strategies, including relationships, self-care, mindfulness-based stress reduction and personal interests, identify reasons for practice burnout and develop strategies to prevent burnout, discover the importance of the humanities in the practice of veterinary medicine.

The aim of this course is to provide a good understanding of reptile husbandry, medicine, and surgery. There will be emphasis on anatomical differences between the four main groups of reptiles: chelonians, lizards, crocodilians, and snakes. This course will help students to understand the differences between reptiles and other more common species in a biological, anatomical, and husbandry sense. Diagnostics, hospital care, anesthesia, analgesia, and critical will be covered, along with diagnostics, surgery, and treatment of commonly occurring diseases and injuries. The emphasis of this course will be on captive reptile species mostly.

In this course, students will learn to recall the major classes of antimicrobial drugs, their mechanism of action, adverse effects, drug interactions and appropriate clinical use, recall the major classes of analgesic drugs, their mechanism of action, adverse effects, drug interactions and appropriate clinical use, recall the major classes of anti-parasitic drugs, their mechanism of action, adverse effects, drug interactions and appropriate clinical use, apply knowledge of antimicrobials and analgesic drugs to decide on a therapeutic course for specific case examples, apply knowledge of anti-parasitic drugs to decide on a prophylactic course for specific animals, discuss the possible effects of co-morbidities on the pharmacokinetics and dosage regimens in patients and discuss possible drug-drug interactions in animals with multiple co-morbidities.

In this course, students will learn to describe the process of early embryologic development, from cleavage through the establishment of the three primary germ layers, to list the major derivatives of each of the three primary germ layers in terms of what general types of tissues and organ systems originate with each, to characterize the normal development of the following organ systems: extraembryonic membranes and fluids; central and peripheral nervous systems; pharyngeal region; skeletal system; muscle in general (skeletal, cardiac, and smooth); septum transversum and diaphragm; gastrointestinal system; respiratory system (upper and lower); urinary system; reproductive system including external genitalia, to define teratogenesis and list common teratogens encountered in veterinary medicine; relate the general outcomes of embryonic/fetal insult during the pre-differentiation, embryonic, and fetal periods to the relevant developmental stage, to distinguish between normal and abnormal twinning in terms of mechanisms producing the twins; identify commonly-seen forms of abnormal twinning in veterinary medicine and characterize the flaw in the normal developmental process that produced the anomaly, to define “congenital anomaly” and characterize the breadth of congenital defects, and to recognize and characterize the general anomalies in development leading to various congenital defects likely to be seen in both small animal and large animal practice.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of environmental health by answering two fundamental questions: How does the environment affect human health? How do we purposefully design environmental policies to optimize human health? This course will examine how chemical, biological, and physical agents found in the natural and manmade environment affect our health. The course will cover the main fields of environmental health sciences including toxicology, exposure science (including routes through air, water, and food media), environmental and occupational epidemiology, and risk assessment. The course will also explore how municipal, state, federal and international agencies design, implement and evaluate the success of environmental and occupational policies, taking into consideration social and economic factors.

This course will cover dynamics and determinants of infectious diseases and their assessment on the molecular to population continuum in a systems-based approach: infectious disease transmission, mechanisms; population susceptibilities; environmental, social, cultural, and economic contributors to infectious disease propagation; detection and surveillance; geographic information systems.

The World Health Organization defines Veterinary Public Health as "the sum of all contributions to the physical, mental and social well-being of humans through an understanding and application of veterinary science." In this course, students will investigate a series of veterinary public health topics, through a combination of pre-class readings, in-class lectures, discussions and activities, and review of recent journal articles relevant to the topics discussed. In addition, students will participate in an in-class exercise using the CDC’s Zoonotic Disease Prioritization Tool, which is currently used by Ministries of Health and Agriculture around the world as part of the Global Health Security Agenda. This course will allow students to apply their veterinary knowledge within the context of current domestic and global public health problems.

This course will provide basic information on the proper care and management of a variety of companion exotic species (i.e., rats, mice, gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, chinchillas, rabbits, ferrets, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs) commonly seen in veterinary practice. Topics will cover common medical problems, including major infectious diseases, non-infectious problems, nutritional problems, and trauma. Diagnostic approaches, medical management, treatments, and vaccination protocols will be presented when appropriate.

This course provides an introduction to canine and feline behavior medicine. Topics include ontogeny of behavior, basic obedience and housetraining, aggression, anxiety, compulsive disorders, elimination problems, psychopharmacology, and other common behavior problems encountered in general practice.

In this course, students will microscopically review and discuss cytological samples from common neoplastic, inflammatory, and infectious disorders.

This course will present the basics of wildlife medicine and rehabilitation including the regulations and ethics covering the rehabilitation and release of native wildlife, major infectious diseases, emerging and zoonotic diseases, parasites, toxicities, injuries and other problems of wildlife. Common treatments, methods and equipment used to care for and rehabilitate these animals will be presented. Species covered will include both native mammals and birds (waterfowl, songbirds, and raptors).